Irate parents pummel gov’t official over porn in class

‘If it’s not suitable to talk about with adults, how can it possibly be suitable to talk about in schools?’

Oct 13, 2019

 

(Image courtesy Pixabay)

Parents infuriated over school-mandated lessons that “promote pornography” have confronted the education secretary in the United Kingdom.

It happened at a recent National Parent Forum of Scotland event.

The Christian Institute explained that one of the parents faced off with Education Secretary John Swinney over the curriculum.

“When [a] father gave a graphic description of what he claimed was being taught, he was asked by the chair of the event to tone down his language. He responded by saying if it’s not suitable to talk about with adults, how can it possibly be suitable to talk about in schools?'” the institute said.

The parents charged the lessons are “corrupting children.”

The lessons on relationships, sexual health and parenthood have been influenced heavily in recent years by pro-LGBT, pro-transgender, pro-abortion activist organizations in the U.K.

“One parent said schools risked ‘normalizing pornography.’ Another challenged the teaching that gender is subjective, calling it a ‘very dangerous and confusing message’ for young people,” the report said.

One parent said: “Pornography is positively promoted in these materials as something beneficial and helpful. These materials are not educational.”

Swinney, in defense, claimed the material is age-appropriate.

But the institute noted that in Warwickshire, children as young as 6 were being taught about masturbation.

“Naomi and Matthew Seymour, who have two sons who attend a primary school in Warwick, removed their children from school for the week the lessons took place.,” the report said.

The institute previously exposed that children as young as 6 were being “taught explicit sex education.”

At issue is the All About Me program, which is part of the government’s Relationships Education. It will be mandatory next year.

The institute said parents at Coten End Primary School in Warwick raised concerns with Jonny Hunt, the sex education consultant who helped to draw up All About Me. They asked Hunt why the section was not in the non-compulsory sex education part of the program.

He response was, “This is not sex education but actually information around safe and appropriate touching.”

The Christian Institute’s Simon Calvert said, “It looks like Warwickshire has paid more attention to a controversial sex education consultancy than to what parents understand to be in the best interests of their children.”

The Christian Institute’s Education Officer John Denning said: “If schools are teaching about sexual activity or sexual relationships, then it is sex education, whatever the school calls it. Parents have a right to request their children are withdrawn from sex education, a request which primary schools must always grant.

“And it is the school’s duty to consult with parents and provide relationships education which is appropriate to children’s age and religious background.”

 

Original here


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