Constitutional Q&A: Knock-and-Talk Police Tactics

April 27, 2017 DOCUMENTS PDF VERSION AVAILABLE HERE © 2017 The Rutherford Institute[1] Those who founded this country strongly believed that “a man’s house is his castle.”[2] This belief—that the sanctity of one’s home should be protected against government invasions—led those who drafted the Constitution and the Bill of Rights to forbid government agents from conducting … More Constitutional Q&A: Knock-and-Talk Police Tactics

Justice Denied: The Government Is Not Going to Save Us

Jan 8, 2018 By John W. Whitehead “The warlords of history are still kicking our heads in, and no one, not our fathers, not our Gods, is coming to save us.”— Journalist Ta-Nehisi Coates The U.S. Supreme Court has ruled: it will not hear the case of Young v. Borders. Despite the fact that a 26-year-old man … More Justice Denied: The Government Is Not Going to Save Us

Supreme Court Allows Trump “Travel Ban” to Take Effect

Dec 5, 2017 by  Warren Mass   The Supreme Court on December 4 granted a stay of the October rulings by two lower courts that had blocked the Trump administration from enforcing its suspension on travel from six majority-Muslim countries. The San Francisco-based NInth Circuit Court of Appeals and a federal district court in Maryland ruled … More Supreme Court Allows Trump “Travel Ban” to Take Effect

Supreme Court to Decide Whether Cellphone Data Falls Under Fourth Amendment

 Nov 28, 2017 by  Michael Tennant On Wednesday, the Supreme Court will begin hearing arguments in a case with enormous implications for Americans’ rights to privacy, freedom of speech, and freedom of association. Specifically, the court is being asked to decide whether the government may obtain information about individuals’ cellphone usage without first getting a warrant … More Supreme Court to Decide Whether Cellphone Data Falls Under Fourth Amendment

SCOTUS Final Sitting of 2017 Will See Four High-Profile Cases

By Elizabeth Slattery | November 27, 2017 U.S. Supreme Court building (Srceenshot) The Supreme Court’s final sitting of 2017 begins this week, and the justices will hear oral arguments in a number of high-profile cases involving the Fourth Amendment, free speech and religious liberty, federalism, and property rights. Here’s a look at the cases coming up. Property … More SCOTUS Final Sitting of 2017 Will See Four High-Profile Cases

Grassley Will Not Allow Senators to Use ‘Blue Slip Courtesy’ to Block Trump’s Judicial Nominees

This column by ACRU General Counsel Ken Klukowski was published November 15, 2017 by Breitbart. WASHINGTON, DC—-Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Chuck Grassley (R-IA) announced Monday that he will not allow any senator to abuse the “blue slip courtesy” to block a judicial nomination. This paves the way for all of President Donald Trump’s nominees to get … More Grassley Will Not Allow Senators to Use ‘Blue Slip Courtesy’ to Block Trump’s Judicial Nominees

Pro-gun Victory: D.C. Decides Not to Appeal Concealed Carry Ruling to Supreme Court

Oct 5, 2017 by  Bob Adelman Effective Thursday, residents of the nation’s capital seeking a concealed carry permit won’t have to show a “good or proper reason” to obtain it. That’s because anti-gun politicians on Washington, D.C.’s council think it’s too risky for them to take their case to the Supreme Court, considering the current political climate there. … More Pro-gun Victory: D.C. Decides Not to Appeal Concealed Carry Ruling to Supreme Court

Supreme Court Kicks Off Annual Term Filled with Big Cases

WASHINGTON, DC —- The Supreme Court on Monday begins an annual term that will tackle a host of hot-button issues, the impact of which the nation will feel for many years to come. The Supreme Court typically hears slightly more than 70 cases per year and summarily reverses lower courts in several more cases without hearing oral … More Supreme Court Kicks Off Annual Term Filled with Big Cases

Federal Appeals Court Strikes Down Third Attempt by D.C. to Restrict Gun Ownership

July 26, 2017 by  Bob Adelmann The U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit ruled Tuesday 2-1 that the district’s third attempt to keep guns out of the hands of its citizens is unconstitutional. The matter has been festering since the Supreme Court ruled in 2008 in District of Columbia v. Heller that individuals have a right to possess … More Federal Appeals Court Strikes Down Third Attempt by D.C. to Restrict Gun Ownership